Organic Standards

Organic Standards

Organic Standards
I would like to give you an update on an aspect related to the organic label. I take my data from an opinion page by Ronnie Cummins printed in the February 2018 issue of AcresUSA. 
I would like to just post the whole article here, but it is quite lengthy and I might make several posts out of this one article as there are several areas being covered.  This one will give you an update on the Organic labeling and introduce you to a new organic label. The discussion taking place here is part of a long going discussion about the idea of allowing Hydroponic Growers to label their vegetables as organic or not allow them to do so. The National Organic Standards Board of the USDA that governs the rules and management of the USDA Orgain label. Some of you may not know that the USDA actually owns the "Organic" label as it applies to labeling your produced food as "Organic".  You have to go through them and be approved by them before you can label your product as Organic. This is much like the names or words, such as "cured" or "healed". There are many words that are not necessarily owned, but they are owned in a way, depending on the context that they are used. So it is as good as being owned. This type of stuff has been affirmed by the US Supreme court in many different cases. Crazy, I know, but it is what it is. Use the name/label/term within a certain context, without their permission and you will get burned.  
Anyway, this board has voted to allow the Hydroponic sourced vegetables to be labeled "Organic". This has not set well with a large number of people that are sort of watchdogs of the organic movement. They attempt to keep the name/label meaning pure. This group of people, which is associated with the Rodale Institute have unveiled draft standards for a new third-party organization to form a new organic label. This new labeling will be branded as the Regenerative Organic Certification. They say that they will have standards that go beyond the USDA's organic standards. They have said the following; "The RO label will appear on certified regenerative products, next to the "USDA Organic" label, alerting consumers to the fact that the RO-labeled product not only meets USDA organic standards but exceeds them". 
A number of consumer watchdog groups have, as they say, been mobilized, to defend and maintain credible organic standards. Most of their efforts have been against Big Corporations, aka as Big Organic In Name Only. They claim to have exposed a number of these imposters as undermining the organic label by selling factory farm dairy and poultry products that are in name only. Some of those corporations are as follows; Aurora, WhiteWave/Horizon, Driscoll's, Herbruck, Cal-Maine, and Walmart. (as a personal note here,  White Wave and Horizon was bought out by Dannon and is now know under the umbrella of a company called Dannonwave).  They also claim the credit of shedding light on a number of "importers" of fake "organic" grains or ingredients from overseas.  They have also taken the deceptive marketers of "natural" and"GMO-free" brands to court. Some of you will note that I have talked about this stuff quite a bit. So just know that it is not me just being a lone wolf freak out there talking about this stuff, the resistance to factory farming practices and the shysters that are deceptively using the organic label is massive and widespread. I am not going to argue the point of whether the organic or GMO thing is good or bad, I am just saying that people shouldn't lie about it.  Just be honest about it. 

As I end this article, you can watch for this label showing up next the USDA Organic stamp. When people pee their pants in glee over the USDA Organic label on their food, essential oils, or whatever, I sort of go barf, barf, because that standard is so low, ever so low. Now with this new additional standard, your confidence level can be moved way up the scale of knowing that what you are getting is as it claims to be.  I am excited over this as it addresses a number of the issues that concerns me. Such as; Energy efficiency (lower costs and low carbon footprint), carbon-sequestering (free fertilizer), and the most important is the regeneration of the resources used. I mean, isn't it stupid to pay big money and get a low-quality product?  Especially when you can have at your disposal a better way to make the costs lower, yet providing a higher quality product as a result of it?  Isn't that a rational concept? I like to think so. 

I would like to do another post, later on, covering the other material in the article. It really is good material.  Thank you for your interest and for your time.