More Meat, Please

Today's article of interest is from The Farm Journal, February 2018 issue. The article is entitled, More Meat, Please. This is more or less a gee-whiz of the consumer's diet habits regarding meat consumption for 2018 as well as some historical data. 

It is forecasted that Red Meat and Poultry Consumption Per Person in 2018 will be as follows; Broiler (Chicken)- 91.9 pounds, that is up by 8.5 pounds since 2014.  Beef- 59.1 pounds, that is up by 4.9 pounds since 2014.  Pork- 52.1 pounds, that is up by 6.3 pounds since 2014.  Turkey -16.6 pounds, that is up by 0.8 pounds since 2014.  Lamb -1.0 pounds, that is up by 0.1 pounds since 2014.   According to the USDA forecasts, the average person will consume 222.2 pounds of meat in 2018, with the average person eating 10 ounces of meat and poultry per day.

Now over on the production side, the domestic production will exceed 100 million pounds in 2018. That forecast is the highest ever recorded. 

When we look at these figures when it comes to domestic vs. foreign it does not represent other meats, such as Fish, Sea Food, other Poultry such as in some cases, such as Duck, Geese, etc. but does in some cases.  Sort of confusing. Then you have to consider the export of some meats and the exports of some meats. However, the consumption figures are pretty much accurately represented. 

I do find this rather interesting as it appears that there is a large segment of the population that is not eating the red meats, white meats and even some of the fish meats. The red meats are as follows; Beef and Lamb.  The white meats are as follows; Boilers (Chicken), Turkey, and Pork. A lot of the other meats are not really even listed in the USDA, mainly because the figures are too low to actually make any difference, from their perspective. Plus they are considered weird and those who consume them as weird as well. That is not my opinion, but theirs, by implication.  An interesting part of this whole deal is that from an earlier article that I reviewed in this blog section, the Organic side is growing at a considerably faster rate than the conventional. 

Then over on the selling side of these products, and the many other foods products we see many large food-related corporations leaving organizations such as the Grocery Manufacturing Association, GMA, and their puppet support groups such as the  International Life Sciences Institute, ILSI. They are moving over to organizations such as the Organic Consumers Association, OCA. This is because of deceptive practices by GMA and ILSI. These corporations are leaving because they recognize that consumers are demanding transparency and honesty.  Some of these issues revolve around the GMO aspects and the deceptive research produced by these so-called organizations representing the groups such as the GMA. In discussions with some of these people that claim that conventional practices and GMO and such are perfectly safe and that people just need to accept that fact. Then out of the other side of their mouth, they bemoan their financial situation. They can't make things work financially since people are too stupid to buy their products. I tell them, hey, it is like this, your products may very well be safe, (which I don't think they are, but that is another argument for another day), but the people that buy the product, do not think it is.  So since they are the consumer, they are the ones that buy it, so if you want to seel your products, then produce what the consumer wants to buy. Why is that so hard to understand?  

They either say or give me the look of, "you are so stupid". The look on my face to them is, "you are so stupid". I mean, if you as the consumer wants your food to be produced a certain way, why can't you have it that way? Why should you buy what you do not want to buy?  The smart thing to do is to produce food that you, the consumer wants to buy, correct?   Kent King.

Today's article of interest is from The Farm Journal, February 2018 issue. The article is entitled, More Meat, Please. This is more or less a gee-whiz of the consumer's diet habits regarding meat consumption for 2018 as well as some historical data. 

It is forecasted that Red Meat and Poultry Consumption Per Person in 2018 will be as follows; Broiler (Chicken)- 91.9 pounds, that is up by 8.5 pounds since 2014.  Beef- 59.1 pounds, that is up by 4.9 pounds since 2014.  Pork- 52.1 pounds, that is up by 6.3 pounds since 2014.  Turkey -16.6 pounds, that is up by 0.8 pounds since 2014.  Lamb -1.0 pounds, that is up by 0.1 pounds since 2014.   According to the USDA forecasts, the average person will consume 222.2 pounds of meat in 2018, with the average person eating 10 ounces of meat and poultry per day.

Now over on the production side, the domestic production will exceed 100 million pounds in 2018. That forecast is the highest ever recorded. 

When we look at these figures when it comes to domestic vs. foreign it does not represent other meats, such as Fish, Sea Food, other Poultry such as in some cases, such as Duck, Geese, etc. but does in some cases.  Sort of confusing. Then you have to consider the export of some meats and the exports of some meats. However, the consumption figures are pretty much accurately represented. 

I do find this rather interesting as it appears that there is a large segment of the population that is not eating the red meats, white meats and even some of the fish meats. The red meats are as follows; Beef and Lamb.  The white meats are as follows; Boilers (Chicken), Turkey, and Pork. A lot of the other meats are not really even listed in the USDA, mainly because the figures are too low to actually make any difference, from their perspective. Plus they are considered weird and those who consume them as weird as well. That is not my opinion, but theirs, by implication.  An interesting part of this whole deal is that from an earlier article that I reviewed in this blog section, the Organic side is growing at a considerably faster rate than the conventional. 

Then over on the selling side of these products, and the many other foods products we see many large food-related corporations leaving organizations such as the Grocery Manufacturing Association, GMA, and their puppet support groups such as the  International Life Sciences Institute, ILSI. They are moving over to organizations such as the Organic Consumers Association, OCA. This is because of deceptive practices by GMA and ILSI. These corporations are leaving because they recognize that consumers are demanding transparency and honesty.  Some of these issues revolve around the GMO aspects and the deceptive research produced by these so-called organizations representing the groups such as the GMA. In discussions with some of these people that claim that conventional practices and GMO and such are perfectly safe and that people just need to accept that fact. Then out of the other side of their mouth, they bemoan their financial situation. They can't make things work financially since people are too stupid to buy their products. I tell them, hey, it is like this, your products may very well be safe, (which I don't think they are, but that is another argument for another day), but the people that buy the product, do not think it is.  So since they are the consumer, they are the ones that buy it, so if you want to seel your products, then produce what the consumer wants to buy. Why is that so hard to understand?  

They either say or give me the look of, "you are so stupid". The look on my face to them is, "you are so stupid". I mean, if you as the consumer wants your food to be produced a certain way, why can't you have it that way? Why should you buy what you do not want to buy?  The smart thing to do is to produce food that you, the consumer wants to buy, correct?   

Kent King.